"The Big Oyster" seafood restaurant is being offered to the market for the first time in history.

Yamba's waterfront icon up for sale

LISTED as Lot 186, Harbour Street Yamba, the innocuous name belies what is one of Yamba's most well known pieces of property.

The former site of The Big Oyster restaurant sits on river views in two directions, and was at the forefront of Yamba's dining scene in the 1980s.

Abandoned for many years, the site has now gone on the market for the first time in its history.

 

"The Big Oyster" seafood restaurant is being offered to the market for the first time in history.

 

 

While Ray White Yamba managing director Daniel Kelly admits the term "one-off" is often overused in the real estate world, there's no doubt it applies here.

"It's a one-of-a-kind site for the CBD area," Mr Kelly said. "We're not even 24 hours into when we've brought it to market, and already plenty of older names from the area are starting to get in contact and say 'we remember that site', and the ideas start flowing.

"As it stands today, it's a site in need of vision and hard work, but the fortuitous new owner of this landmark site will have the benefit of a prime position that can be enjoyed by no other."

Currently owned by the Birrigan Gargle Local Aboriginal Land Council, the site was previously operated under a Crown lease, and is being offered for the sale for the first time.

Run by the Gorman family as a seafood restaurant, takeaway and wholesale oyster business from 1981, it closed in 2014 and has sat dormant since.

 

"The Big Oyster" seafood restaurant is being offered to the market for the first time in history.

 

Zoned SP3 Tourist, Mr Kelly said it allowed a variety of purposes for the redevelopment of the site, including food and drink premises, function centres, kiosks and accommodation.

"I think the interest will come from near and far," he said. "There's a fair bit of nostalgia associated with the site.

"There'll be a lot of curiosity from people not only for what it sells for, but what it becomes in the future."

The site will go to auction on September 5, and Mr Kelly said it was up to the market what the site would fetch.

"I think the fact it's a site that can't be replicated it should hold a fair degree of value for that reason alone," he said.