Why the people helping catch Toyah’s killer are so special

 

TOYAH Cordingley's shocking death has touched Queenslanders in a way not seen since the kidnap and murder of Daniel Morcombe.

Police have revealed the heartfelt reaction across the Far North has led to a flood of tip-offs at the same rate as when the Sunshine Coast teenager disappeared 15 years earlier.

New figures released by Crime Stoppers show that in the first nine weeks after the 24-year-old's death at Wangetti Beach on October 22 last year, close to 1200 calls were received with information linked to the case.

These included a huge percentage of motorists who travelled along the Captain Cook Highway the day she disappeared.

Toyah Cordingley's body was found at Wangetti Beach in October last year. She would have turned 25 on June 14.
Toyah Cordingley's body was found at Wangetti Beach in October last year. She would have turned 25 on June 14.


The pharmacy assistant had been walking her dog along the isolated beach when she was killed.

Police have previously confirmed Innisfail nurse Rajwinder Singh, who left Australia for India just after her death, remains a person of interest in the case.

A legal expert said last week an extradition treaty loophole could mean he is never brought back to Australia.

Daniel Morcombe, 13, was abducted on the Sunshine Coast in 2003.
Daniel Morcombe, 13, was abducted on the Sunshine Coast in 2003.


Crime Stoppers' Cairns volunteer area committee police representative Det Sen-Sgt Kevin Goan, who is also the boss of the Far North's Major and Organised Crime Squad, said their call centre was inundated in the first few weeks of the case.

He said the 1198 calls received between October 22 and December 31 was on a par with the volume of calls which came in for the same period when 13-year-old Daniel Morcombe disappeared from a Sunshine Coast bus stop in 2013.

Crime Stoppers’ Cairns volunteer area committee police representative Det Sen-Sgt Kevin Goan. PICTURE: Andrea Falvo
Crime Stoppers’ Cairns volunteer area committee police representative Det Sen-Sgt Kevin Goan. PICTURE: Andrea Falvo


"A significant percentage of the travelling public (were among the callers) which is tremendous," he said.

"To us that shows a real sense of community and a desire to bring closure for the family. And that is only eclipsed by the number of posters and stickers that went up around the place."

Det Sen-Sgt Goan said in just December alone, of the 258 calls received by Crime Stoppers related to Cairns, 98 were regarding Toyah's case.

Throughout the year there were 3043 contacts made to Crime Stoppers, an anonymous service, in relation to Cairns and more than 1000 came via the website.

Bumper stickers for Toyah have been sent around the world. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE
Bumper stickers for Toyah have been sent around the world. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE


He said in his work as a police officer, the service remained invaluable.

"It's why the QPS cherish the relationship with the organisation and are extremely supportive of volunteer work undertaken by the community, for the community," he said.

Report information anonymously to Crime Stoppers by calling 1800 333 000 or at crimestoppersqld.com.au