Cynthia Bodycote's shot of a passing whale giving a wave off the coast of Angourie.
Cynthia Bodycote's shot of a passing whale giving a wave off the coast of Angourie. Cyn Bodycote

Whales wave as the begin their journey past

AVID photographer and whale-watched Cynthia Bodycote hadn't been out to sea for a month or so, but heading out with her husband early last Wednesday, she thought she'd pack the camera just in case.

"We'd heard there'd been a few whale sightings out a bit, so of course I packed the camera."

It wasn't until they headed back in that a kilometre off the coast near Angourie they saw their first whale of the season.

"It was a playful little thing. We stopped and it was just rolling over and like it was waving at us," she said.

"A couple of times we had to start the motor and move away because it was just coming over to look at us.

"It breached a few times, but mostly just stayed on its side."

Ms Bodycote said she heard later that day from other fisherman there had been quite a few whales sighted early in the season much further off the coast.

During May to November, more than 30,000 Humpback whales migrate from the cold waters of Antarctica to the warmer waters off north east Australia to mate and give birth before heading south again.

Keen whale-watchers can download the free National Parks and Wildlife Service 'Wild About Whales' mobile app, which helps users find the best locations for spotting whales, get real-time notifications of nearby sightings, and record their own sightings.

Ms Bodycote said she was keen to get back out to capture more of the whales, and took this photo on the clear weekday as the first of many for the season.