David Treloar with Jane Towner at the Yamba Markets last month.
David Treloar with Jane Towner at the Yamba Markets last month. Steve Otten

Tributes pour in for Angourie surfer David 'Baddy' Treloar

THE SURFING world is mourning the passing of David "Baddy" Treloar, the man forever remembered running his freshly shaped board down to the Angourie waves in the classic movie Morning of the Earth.

Mr Treloar, aged 67, who left the surf saying he felt unwell, could not be revived after collapsing on Back Beach at Angourie yesterday morning. It is believed he had a heart attack.

The news sparked an outpouring of grief from the surfing culture locally, nationally and around the world.

Tracks website wrote: "For much of his life Baddy was the custodian of the Point at Angourie. His knowledge of the wave was unparalleled and in many ways he made his study of the point a life's work. Along the way he became a counter-culture hero, and also a mentor and father figure to many of the surfers who called Anga' home."

 

A classic surfing image of David 'Baddy' Treloar surfing the inside section at Angourie.
A classic surfing image of David 'Baddy' Treloar surfing the inside section at Angourie. Steve Otten

Swellnet wrote: "Baddy became the archetype for country soul when Alby Falzon captured him shaping a board and running down the track to Angourie in Morning Of The Earth. That sequence, set to the song Simple Ben, became the template for a simpler life, and over nearly half a century Baddy never wavered. In 1995 he told Australia's Surfing Life: 'I just surf and fish. I don't try to do anything else'."

Website Stab said: "Baddy was a huge influence on the last three generations of Australian surfing. You can count Laurie Towner amongst the countless young surfers Baddy took under (his) wing."

The Daily Examiner has talked to the local surfing community, who say his passing will change surfing at Angourie, perhaps forever.

Local surfers predict the traditional "paddle out" surfers hold when one of their crew passes will be massive.

"The paddle out for is going to be huge. People will come from everywhere for him," said friend and photographer Steve Otton.

A full tribute to this man's remarkable life will appear in print and online soon.