EXTREME heat might be making snakes more active, but it's all in a days work for Norman Hill.

As Queensland Health's Acting chief health officer Sonya Bennett warned people that the weekend's extreme weather could lead to more snake bites, Mr Hill was pulling a carpet python out of a car engine in Brookwater.

Mr Hill rescued the slithering invader on Saturday.

"It had gone up under a car tyre...and under the engine."

Mr Hill said the car's owner had returned home and saw the snake on the ground near the car, when he approached it the snake slithered up under the car.

He then took a picture and sent it to the N&S Snake Catcher team.

 

Norman Hill from N&S Snake Catcher pulled this carpet python out of a car in Brookwater on the weekend.
Norman Hill from N&S Snake Catcher pulled this carpet python out of a car in Brookwater on the weekend.

Mr Hill was able to pull the snake out safely and relocated it.

"We've done a few in cars," he admitted.

While the weather has been extremely hot lately Mr Hill said he hadn't noticed an increase in a call outs.

"They do come out more when it's hotter," he said.

"We've been pretty busy this week. We're always busy."

 

Norman Hill from N&S Snake Catcher pulled this carpet python out of a car in Brookwater on the weekend.
Norman Hill from N&S Snake Catcher pulled this carpet python out of a car in Brookwater on the weekend.

Last month Mr Hill said he was called to a job where a venomous White Lipped Pit Viper was holed up.

"The White-lipped Pit Viper are from south east Asia, a bite from this snake can result in intense pain, swelling, necrosis of flesh, and in some cases severe systemic bleeding. Fatalities are very rare but local damage can be lasting," he said.

He handed the snake over to Bio security officers.

Mr Hill said native female snakes would now be sitting on their eggs while males hunted for food.

When the eggs hatch between February and March is when he expects snake sightings to ramp up as hungry mums break their fast and babies also look for food.