Assistant priest Camellia Flanagan, Member for Clarence Chris Gulaptis and Dean of the Christ Church Cathedra Gregory Jenks in the cathedral, which will have repairs to the roof thanks to a government grant.
Assistant priest Camellia Flanagan, Member for Clarence Chris Gulaptis and Dean of the Christ Church Cathedra Gregory Jenks in the cathedral, which will have repairs to the roof thanks to a government grant. Adam Hourigan

Repairing Grafton's history, one tile at a time

HISTORY's most famous rain storm may have lasted forty days and nights, but it is the rain of a hundred years that is slowly deteriorating Grafton's iconic cathedral.

"Due to the architectural design of the building, with the constant soaking and drying of the bricks it changes the mortar and changes the fabric of the bricks themselves turning them into powder,” assistant priest Camellia Flanagan said.

"Still, we've done pretty well,” Dean of the Christ Church Cathedral Gregory Jenks. "The slate is apparently good for about a hundred years, and the first part of the cathedral was 1884, so we've done okay.”

The Cathedral will add to a government grant of $85,000 to begin the second part of the roof restoration, this time in the chapel, and the side entrance transept, with a total cost of $200,000.

This added to a previous government grant of $45,000 that was used to repair the roof near the entrance.

Rev Jenks said the full restoration of the roof would take some time, but the work to restore one of Grafton grandest buildings was progressing as quickly as possible.

"When they started building this place, Grafton had only 1500 people, it's just phenomenal,” he said.

Assistant priest Camellia Flanagan, Member for Clarence Chris Gulaptis and Dean of the Christ Church Cathedra Gregory Jenks in the cathedral, which will have repairs to the roof thanks to a government grant.
Assistant priest Camellia Flanagan, Member for Clarence Chris Gulaptis and Dean of the Christ Church Cathedra Gregory Jenks in the cathedral, which will have repairs to the roof thanks to a government grant. Adam Hourigan