Anthony Wicks (Wicks and Parker) with Shane Fail, Travis Gibson and Conan Jenkins (John Holland) were on site at Acmena Juvenile Justice Centre to lend a hand in the relocation of two containers.
Anthony Wicks (Wicks and Parker) with Shane Fail, Travis Gibson and Conan Jenkins (John Holland) were on site at Acmena Juvenile Justice Centre to lend a hand in the relocation of two containers. Contributed

New containers for centre cultural programs

TWO new containers have been donated and relocated to Acmena Juvenille Justice Centre as part of a collaborative effort to kick off new cultural programs.

John Holland and Wicks & Parker have been working together this week to assist Acmena Juvenile Justice Centre in setting up a Cultural Facility for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in custody.

"The John Holland project team were approached to see if we could lend a hand and we are happy to give our time and resources to projects that can make a big difference to a number of lives,” John Holland Project Director Paul Cassel said.

Once operating, the new facility will assist to:

  • Deliver culturally appropriate interventions in a setting relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture for young men in custody
  • Deliver cultural awareness training to non-Indigenous staff members in an environment that encourages open and honest discussion
  • Promote and strengthen cultural identity and links to community

"Wicks & Parker are pleased to help out our neighbours at Acmena,” Anthony Wicks, from Wicks & Parker, said.

"We hope the facility brings a positive experience to the young people that will use it, and the staff at Acmena as well.”

Anthony Wicks, from Wicks & Parker, said: "Wicks & Parker are pleased to help out our neighbours at Acmena. We hope the facility brings a positive experience to the young people that will use it, and the staff at Acmena as well”.

John Holland Project Director, Paul Cassel, said: "The John Holland project team were approached to see if we could lend a hand and we are happy to give our time and resources to projects that can make a big difference to a number of lives.”

Acmena Manager Greg Hearne said that the facility supports the legacy of providing a positive cultural impact in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people coming into custody through cultural intervention.

"The young people will gain knowledge of their culture and history, with the intention to open their minds and hearts to seek further information from their own community and family,” he said.

"This in turn, will lift their identity and increase their self-respect, with the hope that to one day they will become leaders within their community.”