The Maclean camphor laurel trees earmarked for the chop in Decemeber. Photo Debrah Novak / The Daily Examiner
The Maclean camphor laurel trees earmarked for the chop in Decemeber. Photo Debrah Novak / The Daily Examiner Debrah Novak

Listen up CVC, Maclean wants historic camphors kept

THE Clarence Valley Council is meeting tomorrow afternoon at its Grafton Chambers, to finally decide the fate of Maclean's historic camphor laurel trees in McLachlan Park.

The Council had decided that that only two would be felled in the initial stages of the park's redevelopment, but now a General Manager's Report will be submitted, (backed by a staff recommendation) proposing that all four be felled; probably in October.

Maclean residents fight for Camphor Laurels: The people of Maclean continue to fight for the savior of the Camphor Laurel trees at McLachlan Park.
Maclean residents fight for Camphor Laurels: The people of Maclean continue to fight for the savior of the Camphor Laurel trees at McLachlan Park.

This in spite of there being absolutely no evidence from any public meeting or consultative process that this is what the community wants.

In fact, 1500 people signed the petition, calling for them all to be saved.

They are in a Heritage Precinct, as are many flourishing in Grafton.

This Vee Consultant's plan released publicly only last week, has not been put to public consultation.

The Greater Maclean Community Action Group has been working for our community to protect these much-loved century-old icons.

Almost everyone who hears of this potential outrage is horrified, but even the National Trust, and the Office of Environment and Heritage, and State and Federal governments are frustrated by the fact that this park is designated Crown Land, and the Council are the appointed Trustees.

This destruction is not what the community wants.

The CVC says: 'We're listening'.

In this case, they are not.

How many people would actually sign a petition asking for their removal?

Mayor Williamson says this renovated park will be the envy of riverside towns and villages all along the East Coast.

We are more likely to be pitied.