‘If they want to boo, they can, I thrive on that stuff’

David Warner is batting to a different beat at this World Cup, listening to music during training to "calm him down," while the background noise of hostile crowds only inspires him to perform.

Top 40 hits dominate Warner's playlist and Lewis Capaldi has been pumping in recent weeks.

The mellow tune highlights the new-found rhythm in Warner's life.

The loud boos aren't worry him, even if Capaldi's 'Someone you Loved' track can't drown them out.

"People have the right to come in here, they pay their dollars and if they want to boo us, they can," he said.

 

David Warner has not played at his usual breakneck speed at this World Cup.
David Warner has not played at his usual breakneck speed at this World Cup.

 

"I thrive on that stuff, I love it. I went out to the corner (against England) and copped it.

"At the end of the day you have to smile and, as I said, they pay their money to come and watch us and we are grateful for them to come and sit down and watch us.

 

"We try and put on a good show for everyone."

The headphones are a new addition to Warner, who will father a third daughter on Sunday.

"It is something for me to relax my mind," he said.

 

 

"In the last 12 months I just did a lot of different things (to relax my mind).

"I am not an ice-bath man, but I went and did cryotherapy.

"I did a whole session with my headphones on a couple of times and it really relaxed me at training.

"When you have guys coming at you at 150km you don't want to be listening to any external noise around the training sessions.

"So I just sing along to whatever top 40 is on my (Apple) watch."

 

 

Why is Warner dropping beats?

"It's a tempo thing," he said.

"There is a bit of slow music, but for me it is calming me down while I am out there."

That tempo is matching his batting.

Warner is the World Cup's leading run-scorer, but his 500 runs have come a slightly different way.

Warner's strike-rate has been less than 87 in five out of seven games. Leading up to his ball-tampering suspension his strike-rate was less than 87 in five out of 16 games.

 

 

The left-hander is looking to "pounce" on anything that's short and "throw the kitchen sink" at anything that's full.

Outside of that it is patience, with Australia mastering the blend between Test and T20 skills required in 50-over cricket.

And it is working. After Australia defeated England the Warner-Aaron Finch opening partnership had delivered 642 runs.

India's openers were No. 2 (283) while West Indies openers had managed just 56.

Warner and Finch have survived six out of seven powerplays, averaging 91.7 runs and 17 overs together.

 

Australia's opening partnership has been the bedrock to their run to the semi-finals.
Australia's opening partnership has been the bedrock to their run to the semi-finals.

 

Warner's footwork struggled at the crease early but now that he has found his groove he reflected on the harder times of his ban.

"For me it is about enjoying the game when it is taken away from you," he said.

"You realise what it is all about. Going back to grassroots was fantastic - I really saw smiles on people's faces to be out there on a Saturday afternoon.

"All the volunteers that come down and put time and effort in, whether it is making the drinks or making the lunches.

"People's parents, my mum, my dad coming down, it is just great.

"You can't take that for granted."