CAUGHT ON CAMERA: Remote cameras are used to track wild dog activity but community input is also vital.
CAUGHT ON CAMERA: Remote cameras are used to track wild dog activity but community input is also vital. North Coast Local Land Services

Gulmarrad wild dogs in the spotlight

AFTER a recent spike in wild dog activity in the Gulmarrad area, North Coast Local Land Services is encouraging landholders and residents to work together and report any wild dog activity to increase the effectiveness of baiting and trapping programs.

NCLLS invasive species team leader Dean Chamberlain said they're asking residents and land owners to remain alert and report any wild dog activity.

"In general, most people think of impacts as being related to domestic livestock and pets but this is only part of the story," he said.

"The area where control is proposed is also home to threatened and endangered wildlife such as coastal emus, bettongs and Brush-tailed Phascogales, all of which will benefit from a reduced wild dog population."

According to NCLLS, a major part of effective wild dog control was effective community engagement and people actively engaged in wild dog control in a proactive way. Co-ordinated group baiting programs are the most cost effective way to control wild dogs, and landholders within the area are encouraged to form a local control group, with trapping and shooting a good way to follow up a baiting program to remove any remaining wild dogs.

Wild dogs are considered a serious pest in Australia attacking livestock and native animals, potentially spreading diseases and threatening human health, safety and wellbeing. Wild dog attacks on livestock and pets, lethal or otherwise, also cause emotional distress to landholders.

Residents and land owners can alert and report wild dog activity to senior biosecurity officer Tiffany Felton on 0427 458 591.