An artist’s impression in October, 2015 of how the revamped McLachlan Park could look. Clarence Valley Council has voted simplified McLachlan Park development guidelines that doesn't include some of the 'fancy' improvements such as boardwalks and sandstone walls.
An artist’s impression in October, 2015 of how the revamped McLachlan Park could look. Clarence Valley Council has voted simplified McLachlan Park development guidelines that doesn't include some of the 'fancy' improvements such as boardwalks and sandstone walls.

End for camphor laurels as Mclachlan Park revamp closer

FOUR controversial camphor laurel trees in Maclean's McLachlan Park could be gone before Christmas.

Clarence Valley Council is only weeks away from calling for tenders for the revamp of the park.

The removal of the trees is one of the mandated requirements of that plan.

Council's director of governance and works, Troy Anderson, said the winning tender would be presented at the council's September meeting.

"Construction will begin as soon as possible after that," Mr Anderson said.

He said it was feasible for the work to be finished before Christmas but that would depend on the winning tenderer's construction timeline.

"Time will be one of the evaluation criteria," Mr Anderson said.

"It's hard to predict when the project will be finished until we know those details, but it will be done as quickly as possible."

The plan requires the removal of the four camphor laurel trees that line the River St boulevard, a move that has angered some in the community.

They claim council has not adequately consulted them on the removal and the trees should remain as part of the town's heritage.

Mr Anderson said removal of the trees was a requirement of the planning code and would be part of the initial phases.

He said the plans the council was about to put into practise showed there had been extensive consultation with the community.

"The design of the master plan shows budget constraints and elements we have picked up from consulting with the community," he said.

To fit the budget, the master plan has reduced the dimensions of the wooden boardwalk.

"From the community consultation we have included the relocation of commemorative plaques," Mr Anderson said.

"We have also included indigenous heritage interpretive signage which was one of the strong re-sponses we received from the community."

Mr Anderson said there might still be a few tweaks to the design but the current plan is close to final.