Page MP Kevin Hogan with members of the Yuraygir Landcare group at Tucabia.
Page MP Kevin Hogan with members of the Yuraygir Landcare group at Tucabia.

$23k boost for Valley environment projects

CLARENCE Valley Landcare groups have more than $23,000 in government grants to help them with projects restoring the local environment.

The Clarence Environment Centre and Yuraygir Landcare Group have both received Federal Government money to continue vital works in the region.

the Member for Page, Kevin Hogan visited the region this week to inspect the work of the groups while announcing the grants.

Mr Hogan said the Environment Centre has been working to protect old growth forestry at Hayards Crossing, removing infestations of high priority weeds and restoring riverbanks.

John Edwards, left and Kevin Hogan at the Environment Centre.
John Edwards, left and Kevin Hogan at the Environment Centre.

“It was great to announce almost $20,000 to support this important project,” Mr Hogan said.

“Through this funding, they can continue to reduce the impact of weeds and re-establish native vegetation on riverbanks.”

“The weed removal will improve the vegetation of the forest and assist native species.”

“Threatened fauna in the area include the Grey Headed Flying Fox, Little Bentwing Bat and Black Necked Stork.”

“This project will improve animal habitats and food resources.”

“The Orara River is a popular for recreation, including swimmers and fishers. Through removing weeds it will improve the aesthetic of the site.”

Another organisation, the Yuraygir Landcare Group has been working to protect the environment at Tucabia Flora Reserve.

Mr Hogan said it was an important learning resource for schools and TAFE in the Clarence Valley.

“It was great to announce $3,580 to support this important project,” Mr Hogan said.

“Phase 1 of this project was to create a botanical reserve at Tucabia to preserve the endangered paperbark Melaleuca irbyana.”

“Through the next phase, Yuraygir Landcare Group will buy and plant more seedlings to develop the area.

“Planting is done on a voluntary basis by students, Scout groups and people participating in programs such as Work for Dole.”

“They will also buy and install plant identification signs. These include a QR code that links the plant to NSW Flora Online.”

“The team purchase and use nest boxes for birds, bats and other animals that require hollows to nest and roost in.”

He said the group would also use this funding to:

  • Finalise the ponds and stock with native aquatic flora/fauna
  • Buy and spread mulch around the plants/plant
  • Plant more koala trees at the Reserve and install interpretative signs